The Silent Pages

Speak more than words

133,701 notes

supernatural-tardis:

i had a crush on this guy and i decided to pull a Pavlov on him by offering him whenever i saw him  this brand of candy he seemed to really like and after a while whenever he saw me he got excited for a second then you could see his expression shift to wondering the why the hell was he so happy to see me and i swear it was the evilest thing but also the most hilarious i made a guy like me by conditioning him into associating me to a candy he liked

(via ktmakesart)

50 notes

We in the book community are in the middle of a sustained conversation about diversity. We talk about our need for diverse books with diverse characters written by diverse writers. I wholeheartedly agree.

But I have noticed an undercurrent of fear in many of our discussions. We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say.

This fear can be a good thing if it drives us to do our homework, to be meticulous in our cultural research. But this fear crosses the line when we become so intimidated that we quietly make choices against stepping out of our own identities.

After all, our job as writers is to step out of ourselves, and to encourage our readers to do the same.
Gene Luen Yang’s rousing diversity speech at the 2014 National Book Festival gala (via fourteenery)

(Source: tubooks, via robintalley)

94,928 notes

cognitivedissonance:

After threats against her life, Anita Sarkeesian canceled an upcoming talk at Utah State University. Gamergate trolls are celebrating on Twitter while simultaneously dismissing the threats as nothing. Does this read like nothing to you?

“I will write my manifesto in her spilled blood, and you will all bear witness to what feminist lies and poison have done to the men of America.”

The email’s author threatened to murder feminist women indiscriminately in a mass shooting. And because carrying guns on campus outweigh the right of students and guests to be safe, Anita Sarkeesian canceled her talk.

BUT WE SHOULDN’T FEEL THREATENED, RIGHT?

BECAUSE IT’S JUST THE INTERNET, RIGHT?

The bullies won this time. And if you think this shit isn’t dangerous, I’m fresh out of fucks to give and I’m not restocking any time soon. It’s goddamn wrong to to dismiss this by claiming the author isn’t serious. Elliot Rodger’s rantings were dismissed until it was too late.

This. Is. Not. OK.

(via laurendestefano)

35 notes

Tales of writing and right paths: Alis Franklin and Sara Megibow: Diversity in fiction (and how we redefine 'normal').

weneeddiversebooks:

Author Alis Franklin says of the We Need Diverse Books campaign: “It’s incredibly validating, if you grew up never seeing yourself reflected anywhere in pop culture, to have other people actually come along and say, “You’re right, that does suck, and you do deserve stories both created by and featuring people who are like you.” And not just to have them, but to have a multitude of them, presented front-and-centre in the mainstream, not just one single narrative pushed to the back in some dusty “special interests” corner.”

192,034 notes

Imagine this:
Instead of waiting in her tower, Rapunzel slices off her long, golden hair with a carving knife, and then uses it to climb down to freedom.
Just as she’s about to take the poison apple, Snow White sees the familiar wicked glow in the old lady’s eyes, and slashes the evil queen’s throat with a pair of sewing scissors.
Cinderella refuses everything but the glass slippers from her fairy godmother, crushes her stepmother’s windpipe under her heel, and the Prince falls madly in love with the mysterious girl who dons rags and blood-stained slippers.

Imagine this:
Persephone goes adventuring with weapons hidden under her dress.
Persephone climbs into the gaping chasm.
Or, Persephone uses her hands to carve a hole down to hell.
In none of these versions is Persephone’s body violated unless she asks Hades to hold her down with his horse-whips.
Not once does she hold out on eating the pomegranate, instead biting into it eagerly and relishing the juice running down her chin, staining it red.
In some of the stories, Hades never appears and Persephone rules the underworld with a crown of her own making.
In all of them, it is widely known that the name Persephone means Bringer of Destruction.

Imagine this:
Red Riding Hood marches from her grandmother’s house with a bloody wolf pelt.
Medusa rights the wrongs that have been done to her.
Eurydice breaks every muscle in her arms climbing out of the land of the dead.

Imagine this:
Girls are allowed to think dark thoughts, and be dark things.

Imagine this:
Instead of the dragon, it’s the princess with claws and fiery breath
who smashes her way from the confines of her castle
and swallows men whole.

'Reinventing Rescuing,' theappleppielifestyle. (via justawordshaker)

(Source: theappleppielifestyle, via caitlings)

17 notes

Anonymous asked: Hi! I was wondering about Victor's name... Did you ever find it strange that you named him Victor, considering you're called Victoria?

veschwab:

So in the very early stages of the project, Victor didn’t actually go by his real name, but his villain identity, which was “Vicious,” and I worked backward, to decide that it was born from “Vic” which then became “Victor.”

As for the name similarities, it’s a running joke with my publishers, because my middle name is Elizabeth (Eli). So basically, Victor and Eli are both me :p